Literature Through Art

Grades: 3-6
Tour length:
1.5 hours
Location:
900 S. Beretania Street
Dates:
Tuesday – Friday
Times:
9 + 10:30am
Group Size:
60 maximum
Fee:
FREE
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SEE ART:

Do your students love stories? In this engaging tour, students “read” works of art from our permanent collection and make connections between art and literature. Through hands-on activities, careful observation, sketching, lively discussions, poetry writing, and reading, students discover how artists from around the world bring stories to life in art. They will describe the characters from the longest story ever told from India, determine the sequencing of a story from Ancient Greece, understand how poetry and art are deeply connected in China, and hear a creation story from the Native American Indians. Everyone loves to hear stories, but seeing how they are illustrated in art can be even more fun!

All students will receive this booklet to use on the tour and to take back to the classroom.

Artwork on this tour:
Sarcophagus Relief Depicting a Labor of Hercules (detail). Roman, mid-2nd century A.D. Marble. Gift of Anna Rice Cooke, 1932 (3602).
(Pictured above)

Piero di Cosimo (Italian, c. 1461–c. 1521) Saint John the Evangelist, 1504–6. Oil on wood panel. Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, 1961 (2989.1).

BORROW ART:

Continue your museum experience back at school! Borrow artifacts related to your tour from the Lending Collection to use in the classroom. The Lending Collection is a free resource for island educators. Pre-packaged object trunks available for some tours, or hand pick objects from the collection for any tour. Contact Elizabeth (Beth) Doughty, Lending Collection Manager: edoughty@honolulumuseum.org, 808-532-8736. 

Hawaiʻi Department of Education Benchmarks

LA.3.5.4 Use specific verbs and adverbs to describe people, places, things, or events
LA.3.1.5 Read grade-appropriate narrative and informational text aloud with fluency and accuracy
LA.3.1.3 Use new grade-appropriate vocabulary, including homophones and homographs, introduced in stories, informational texts, word study, and reading

3.RL.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers
3.RL.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text
3.RL.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events
3.RL.7 Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)
3.RI.7  Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur)
3.RF.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension
4.RL.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text
4.RL.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text
4.RL.3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions)
4.RL.7 Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text
4.RF.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension
5.RL.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text
5.RL.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text
5.RL.3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact)
5.RL.7 Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel; multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem)
5.RF.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension
6.RL.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
6.RL.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments
6.RL.3 Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution
6.RL.7 Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch
6.RI.3  Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes)

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